another shooting

This was posted by one of my favorite professors when I was an undergrad. This is just another something that I wanted to blog about, but haven’t gotten around to yet. I guess this is the problem with working and trying to manage three blogs. I intend to keep all three though, so I guess reblogs are to be expected.

BJ's Blog

I’ve been thinking about this a lot–especially since my “Frontier” class in the summer. What is the American obsession with guns? Why do we, as a culture, cling so fiercely to our right to carry? How does this right trump the rights of ordinary citizens, students, children, parishioners to go about their lives doing what America promises them: to learn, speak, and worship freely?

My theory: we like the after-effect of a mass shooting. I know that sounds perverse, so let me explain. After a shooting–the killing of innocents–we locate the heroes, the people who sacrificed themselves for others, who took bullets for someone else, who tried to disarm the murderer, who stormed the airplane’s cabin and crashed the jet rather than allow the flight to hit its intended target. We like these stories a lot. I would argue that we like them so much that we’re willing to let mentally…

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I’m pro-choice, NOT pro-abortion. You heard me

I’m actually very much against abortion.

It’s interesting that I learned my progressive idealism from my father who considers himself a conservative.  Dad is pro-choice. When I learned his stance on it, I still hadn’t made up my own mind. In fact, as I do now, I felt that abortion was completely wrong and immoral. So I had to ask Dad why he felt that way.The first thing, Dad explained to me, is that morality should always be a choice, otherwise it is nothing more than forced obedience. To be able to choose is true freedom.

Not long before that, I complained to my mother, (who, to me, is ultra-conservative), that my ex-husband was always trying to constrain my choices despite the fact that we were no longer married (of course, the fact that he always tried, was one of the biggest reasons for leaving in the first place). She pointed out that part of the LDS belief system is that we were given our own agency with the intent that we, and no one else, would have control over our own salvation. In fact, she pointed out, it was Lucifer’s idea to take away the agency of humankind, resulting in what we know to be The Plan of Salvation:  “And they are free to choose liberty and eternal life, through the great Mediator of all men, or to choose captivity and death, according to the captivity and power of the devil; for he seeketh that all men might be miserable like unto himself.” (2 Ne. 2:26–27)

Suddenly, as distasteful as the choice to abort a pregnancy was to me, I knew that it would be wrong to legislate against that choice. Continue reading

The Land of the Free, and the Home of the Oblivious

As I stand with my hand over my heart for the passing flag in tomorrow’s parade, I will be thinking of my freedom to choose whether or not to do so.

Latter Day Liberal

The Pledge of Allegiance and the 11th Article of Faith

One of the perks of living in the “land of the free” is that I get to write whatever I want in this blog, without fear of penalty.  Another perk is that I get to worship however I choose (or not) without fear of retribution. This means that I can join any religion, and practice any religion, or not, depending on my own personal convictions. With or without religion, there are many people out there who have made a place for God in their lives.  There are also many who have chosen not to make a place for God in their lives.  Having true freedom means that whatever choice is made, there will be no penalties. No retribution.

And my own religion supports these freedoms. When the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints was still quite young, Joseph…

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Secularism Won and it’s a Good Thing Too

This is what I posted on Facebook yesterday:”I was so saddened today to hear that my support of the LGBT community is translated as opposition to The Church’s stance on same-sex marriage. Nothing could be further from the truth. I have come out celebrating this as a civil rights issue, not as a marriage issue. I have seen children of “good LDS families” homeless and wandering the streets, and worse, suicidal because they would rather face death than face their families with a truth they cannot change. I celebrate this as a member of the church because it has opened the door to closed minds.” I was even more saddened that only one of the sweet, supportive comments came from an LDS friend. And then one of my former-LDS-gay friends posted this:

Secularism Won and it’s a Good Thing Too

(Sorry, you will have to click on the blog title because I accidentally reposted into the wrong blog, and it wont let me repost a second time.)

Congratulations!

Now EVERYBODY is free to marry the person of their choice.

Screenshot 2015-06-26 11.12.25

I learned about it on Facebook. I get more accurate news there, even if it is wildly conflated along party lines. The nice thing about Facebook is that I get both points of view, nearly simultaneously, and it is so much easier to get a clear picture that way.  After all, there are many sides to every story.

So this morning I got the post from a gay friend first. Next I heard from a conservative relative, and following that, this from my visiting teaching partner:

Screenshot 2015-06-26 12.08.33

Here is the complete text from the LDS Church’s press release:

“The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints acknowledges that following today’s ruling by the Supreme Court, same-sex marriages are now legal in the United States. The Court’s decision does not alter the Lord’s doctrine that marriage is a union between a man and a woman ordained by God. While showing respect for those who think differently, the Church will continue to teach and promote marriage between a man and a woman as a central part of our doctrine and practice.”

I don’t know my new partner well, and the conversation that followed proved it.

I couldn't have said it better.

I couldn’t have said it better. And so in the spirit of the day:

  #ProudtoLove

Mister Gloomy, you don’t belong here!

A few thoughts on depression from my son, Jake Barrett, and his good friends Andy and Taylor Checketts. The three of them make up the band Waiting For Compromise:
Sometimes misery seems to follow you everywhere you go.

This song is available for purchase on iTunes, Google Play, Amazon, and more.

About the Music:
Jake Barrett: lead vocal
Andy Checketts: guitar/backup vocal
Taylor Checketts: piano/backup vocal/audio mixing
Bass, drums, cellos, and ambience were added using Logic Pro X.

About the Video:
Directed by Andy Checketts and Taylor Checketts.
Filmed and edited by Andy Checketts.
-Cast
Man: Braden Randall Gubler
Mr. Gloomy: Collin Jones
Man with mirror: Andy Checketts